By Josh Mabry, Local News Partnerships and Amber Burgess, CrowdTangle

If your News Feed was flooded with people talking about the eclipse this past week, you weren’t alone. 66 million people had 240 million interactions around the solar eclipse, making it a bigger event on Facebook than the 2017 Super Bowl. There were 129,000 Facebook Live broadcasts, and videos related to the eclipse (both live and non-live) were viewed over 365 million times.

With viewing parties happening across the country, it became a great topic for local news outlets to report on throughout the day. Using CrowdTangle, we discovered some ways local publishers connected with their communities and covered the eclipse around the U.S.

1. The Oregonian tracked down the photographer behind this already iconic shot.

 

2. The Lincoln Star Journal had a special guest for #EclipseLive — Bill Nye the Science Guy.

 

3. Many cameras pointed toward the sky for #EclipseLive, but KATU decided to show people a different perspective. Check out this timelapse from above.

 

4. Local television groups that own and operate many stations across the country like TEGNA, Sinclair and Gray, linked coverage from affiliates along the eclipse path, offering audiences a view of the event in full from coast to coast.

TEGNA:

Sinclair:

Gray:

 

5. ABC 7 shared this photo from the Statue of Liberty during New York’s partial eclipse.

 

6. The Knoxville News Sentinel used 360 video to capture the total eclipse and the reactions of onlookers in Sweetwater, Tennessee.

 

7. Seattle’s KING 5 created a countdown leading up to the total eclipse.

 

8. The Chronicle Telegram shared this photo from Cedar Point’s Valravn roller coaster, lit by a partial eclipse in the background, right before a 214-foot plunge back down to Earth.

 

9. WSOC captured this view from their studios in Charlotte.